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Mercedes-Benz E220d Uses New Diesel Four-Cylinder in Europe

Published on www.automobilemag.com

February 16, 2016
2017 Mercedes Benz E Class Rear Three Quarter In Motion 01

Mercedes-Benz has released a breakdown of the available powertrains on the 2017 E-Class it will offer in Europe, including specifics on a new 2.0-liter turbodiesel inline-four. The new oil-burner represents “the birth of a new Mercedes-Benz engine family,” so we can expect to see it pop up in more European applications soon.
2017 Mercedes Benz E Class Front Three Quarter 02

The new engine replaces the outgoing 2.1-liter diesel four-cylinder used in the U.S market’soutgoing E250 Bluetec. Mercedes-Benz will use the E220d nomenclature for this model in Europe, and the new engine is good for 195 hp and 295 lb-ft of torque. That power matches the output of the old engine despite the smaller size, though torque is down significantly compared to the 2.1-liter’s stout 369 lb-ft. The E220d will be paired to Benz’s new nine-speed automatic transmission, and Mercedes claims the new mill achieves “new dimensions in efficiency.” Single-stage turbocharging with variable turbine geometry are part of the new package, along with an aluminum cylinder head and crankcase as well as reduced friction between the cylinder and piston.
2017 Mercedes Benz E Class Prototype Interior

A spokesman from Mercedes-Benz would not comment on when this new diesel-powered 2017 E-Class would hit U.S. shores. Given the circumstances (thanks, VW), Mercedes-Benz USA might genuinely not know yet, either. There was supposed to be a diesel C-Class (C300d) hitting showrooms in the U.S. by this month, but it would appear that timeline has been delayed. A GLC300d is also planned for 2016, but it remains to be seen whether that launch will remain on schedule.
No doubt Mercedes-Benz is taking extra measures to ensure its U.S.-bound diesels meet emissions standards, but you can bet they’re also evaluating public opinion on diesels in general. Look for more details on the future of diesel in the U.S. as the months go on.